Waka waka "esto es Afriac"

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Thursday, April 19, 2012

Zambezi River Day

Yesterday John had budget planning meeting with several church leaders along the Zambezi River. He asked if we wanted to go along.

We left home at 7 am and headed out of town. As you leave the "city" you see the rice fields. Men and women work the fields all day. Bent over all day long. Somehow, their backs adjust. If they aren't bent over a rice field they are bent over cooking, cleaning or making charcoal. They are constantly caring huge bundles of everything on their heads. Walking for miles daily. Back breaking work.

Anyway, the boundry lines for each prerson's property is usaually a banana tree. From the air you can see the property lines are not at all straight. But it works for them.

They dont live at the rice field because it is flooded most of the time so they walk there from their villages.

You can see the villages along the highway. They all have crops there too. They all grow sweet potatoes, coconut, mango, pineapple and sesame seads.

There is a difference in the huts in this new area we are going. They use grass instead of coconut leaves as roofs.

I kept noticing this hugs mounds of dirt. I ask John what they were. He said, ant hills. Some are a big as a house. John said there is something in the dirt after the ant processes it that makes it a little sticky so they use it to cover the sticks that make walls for their huts.

They all cook outside so there is alwys a fire going.

Make shift stands are all over the side of the highway. They are mostly selling charcoal. They make the charcoal. John said they dig a pit. Put a tree in it. Cover it with dirt leaving a few holes Somehow catch it on fire and let it smolder all night. In the morning they have charcoal. They bag it up and take it to their stand.

Even on the highway there are still lots of people walking and riding bikes. Barley room for two cars to pass each other without having to watch out for children, pedestrians and bike ridders.

We had traveled about an hour and a half when we came to another "city" where we picked up a man named Choozy... What a delightful man. He speaks several language in the area. He has been ridding his bike for years way back into the village areas to teach them about Jesus Christ. When my husbad Kris was here in 2005 he filmed the ordination of Choozy. He remembered Kris. He was caring a bag that said Golden Gate Seminary on it. I guess he probably got it from David Johnson.

Choozy had lost a wife and several chilldren. One of his adult children just passed away from HIV. HIV is pretty bad here.

Back on the highway we went. All of a sudden we came upon tree limbs in the road. John said that mean there is a acciddent a head. They use the tree limbs like cones to warn people to slow down

Another hour and we stopped at another "city" to pick up many more men. There was an open market there John let me walk around. Smoked fish was on most of the tables. All kinds of fish. Flies all over the fish. Wasnt too appetizing for me.

Tables with fresh fruit. I purchased some bananas, maybe 10 or 12 for less than a dollar. I didnt know a banana could taste so good. Fresh really makes a difference

Off we went back down the highway. All of a suden off in the distance John says, do you see it? See what? look the bridge! The Zambezi bridge. I guess its new and quite a big deal around here. They had to use a fairy until the bridge was built. The bridge got closer and closer but we turned off before we got to it. We had to take John to his meeting.

Off the highway now and back on dirt roads with huge potholes again. We come across a beautiful resort with well manicured lawns. Huge pastures with water buffalos and cows. White birds riding on the backs of the buffalos. Awww, I said to my self... As we drive right by and keep going deeper and deeper into the village. We arrive at the church some 3 hours or so from when we left.

For some reason when John said he had a budget meeting with some church leaders I didnt picture this.
Again, a one room church with mud walls and a grass roof. But, what was different about this church, from the minute we pulled up the entire church came out and were singing loudly to welcome us. Wonderful Africa style music with drums and women using their tongs to make this yell sound. It was all to welcome us to their church. It was very emotional for me. I had tears in my eyes. They escorted us into the church. Once in they sang even louder! It was powerful. Then they asked us to introduce our selves. Hello and good bye are very important in this culture. After we were introduced Wanne, Cheryl and I were allowed to leave and they continued with their planning meeting.

Well, we went back to that resort and had lunch. We sat on a huge porch. It reminded me of Gone with the Wind. We looked out over rolling hills of Africa leading to the Zambezi River. Another emotional moment. Another tear. Lunch was so good. Cheryl and I ordered a beef and shrimp cabob and Wanne ordered fish. They leave the head on the fish here. I hope I can download the picture later.

After a relaxing lunch we returned to the village church to get John. They were just finishing up however, when your finished here the church wants to feed you so we waited as that great church fed the men

Soon we were on our way home. Dark came pretty fast. It's really dark hear with no lights. However, it doesn't keep the people from walking and riding their bikes along the highway.

After a while John pulled over and we all got out. He pointed out the Southern Crux (cross) That is a sight to behold. I felt like God was saying, I'm here with you and so is my son... Another emotional moment. We got back in and traveled home. Once home I saw that the Southern cross was still there. It is just right out their back door just above their house. God is here! And HE is with me!
What a glorious day at the Zambezi

1 comment:

  1. Gosh - I feel like I am there with you. You describe everything in such detail. The pictures back it all up. Thank you for sharing your trip with us!

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